Saturday, April 18, 2015

Thanks for stopping by...


Welcome to my home away from home blog. I reserve this site for large author events so unless I'm participating in one of those, I'm rarely here. I invite you to visit my main blog where I post writerly things and interesting topics daily. 
I'm an eclectic and curious info hound so you're sure to find something interesting. 


۞>
Daily & Weekly Happenings on my Other Blogs
<۞

http://calliopesotherwritingtablet.blogspot.com/

http://theancillarymuse.blogspot.com/  

Check out the d
aily Exquisite Quills' meme!
It's a promo op for all authors.
Just follow the theme of the day.
http://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/


۞>See my Links page for more<۞

Friday, April 17, 2015

Day 10 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong. Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles.
Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞


Known regionally as elephant ears, and as Cardoon to Italians everywhere, burdock is distant relative to the artichoke. Here's another delicious recipe for this invasive weed.

Breaded Cardoon


12 to 18 burdock stalks (leafy parts removed and discarded)
4 beaten eggs
1 c. Italian-style seasoned breadcrumbs
2 T. flour
1 pinch of baking powder
Salt and pepper
2 T. Parmesan cheese
Olive oil


 
Cut stalks (like celery) into 3 inch pieces. Par-boil until tender. Drain and set aside. Using three pans or dishes side by side create a dipping station. Add flour and baking powder to the first dish. Add beaten eggs to the next. Add cheese, crumbs, salt and pepper to the last. Heat oil in a skillet. Dip the stalks one at a time in this order: Flour, egg, and crumbs. (The flour helps the egg stick, and the egg helps the crumbs stick). Drop carefully into hot oil, cook both sides until golden brown.

 ۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/
 
I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Day 9 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong. Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles.
Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

As mentioned the other day, Lamb's Quarters, or wild spinach, is a tasty weed. You can use it in any recipe calling for spinach.


Wild Spinach (lambs quarters) & Mushrooms


2 tsp olive oil  
3 cloves
minced garlic
1/4 cup minced shallots
4 cups mushrooms any combination of button, portobello, shiitake, porcini, chanterelle, oyster, or cremini
3 T dry wine or sherry
1 1/2 T soy sauce

3 cups bagged spinach OR wild spinach lambs quarters
In a large skillet over medium heat, add oil and saute shallots and garlic until translucent. Add mushrooms and cook until tender. Add  soy sauce and sherry and simmer. Add wild spinach and simmer until spinach wilts. Stir often.


Optional~ add a half brick of light cream cheese and stir until melted. Serve over noodles, rice, or polenta. 

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/

I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Day 8 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞ 
Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong. Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles.
Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
 .
Purslane & Black Olive Tapenade

1/2 c. pitted black olives
1/2 c. chopped purslane
1 small clove minced garlic
2 anchovies, minced
Light drizzle of lemon juice
1 T olive oil
Red pepper flakes
Salt and pepper to taste

With short pulses in a food processor, rough chop olives, purslane, garlic, and anchovies. Nice bits, not too pasty. In a bowl, add lemon juice, olive oil, and red pepper, salt and pepper to taste. Serve on toasted bread, pita, or tortilla chips.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/
 
I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Day 7 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong. Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles.
Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
.
Dandelion Chips

You need: Dandelion Greens
Sea Salt
Olive Oil
Wash and dry dandelion greens. Discard any thick ribs. Drizzle olive oil and hand toss to lightly coat evenly. Place in a single layer onto a baking sheet. Bake at 350°  for 8-12 minutes. Watch closely or they might burn. Remove from the oven and sprinkle the leaves with seasonings. I use sea salt but you can use adobo, cayenne, or garlic powder too.

۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/
 
I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Monday, April 13, 2015

Day 6 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong.
Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles. Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
 ۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Stinging Nettle Soup
15 cups of nettles
(loosely packed)
3 cloves minced garlic
3 small-sized shallots
3 T butter or oil
1 qt. chicken stock - your own or canned
Salt and pepper

Harvest stinging nettles with gloves. Wash and blanch in boiling water for 30 seconds (all the prickles will be gone). Drain and plunge in ice water bath. Drain and chop coarsely. Mince garlic and shallots. In a  stock pot , add butter and saute until just translucent. Add chicken stock and chopped nettles and simmer on low heat. Cook for twenty minutes or until nettles are soft. Eat as is, or cool slightly and puree in a blender. Reheat and serve. Add salt and pepper to taste.



۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/

I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Day 5 Authors in Bloom Blog Hop!

It's time for the Authors in Bloom Blog Hop! 
Join dozens of authors in a themed celebration of spring. Find the other participants at the end of this post. The grand prize is an e-reader of your choice (up to $200 value). The second prize is $25 gift card. And... each participating author is offering up something as well. (see mine below) The winners will be chosen from comments so be sure to add your email address when you leave yours. Just so you know, only those visitors who visit EACH and EVERY stop are eligible for the grand prize.


۞>>>>۞<<<<۞
Many years ago, my husband and I led off-campus wild food programs for the Chicago Field Museum. Not only was the outing a biology and natural history lesson, it was a you pick/I cook day. Foragers and Foodies should be aware of what they're doing if they plan to eat from the wild. Read first. Guide books and online sources with pictures are best.

Before I continue ~

Important to know about wild foods:
Whether you're new to wild harvests or an old pro at munching your way through the weeds in your backyard, I think it's
worth repeating a few things. Some populations of plants are barely surviving due to competition by aggressive invaders, climate changes, and  mindless harvesting. Just because you can eat that native species, doesn't mean you should. It's best to just eat the weeds and leave the rest. As far as exotic weeds go, munch away. They don't belong here anyway and they taste great. Be safe! Before you start picking, be sure  no pesticides or herbicides have been used there. Only pick where you know for sure.

About mushrooms:
It's easy to get it wrong. Depending on the stages of growth, some poisonous varieties look exactly like edibles.
Don't chance it. You should leave mushrooms alone anyway. They play an important role in the ecosystem and conditions must be just right for them to grow.
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Dandelion Jelly
Pick blossoms at their freshest in the late morning when they first open. This recipe needs a  lot of flowers. I recommend going for the largest blossoms you can find.
4 c. dandelion blossoms, no green parts at all. I use scissors and snip the green away.
3 c. boiling water
4 ½ c. sugar
2 T Freshly-squeezed lemon juice
1 envelope powdered pectin

Separate the yellow blossoms from the green stem and sepals (little green leaves around the bud). Any green will impart a bitter flavor. Pack the blossoms into a 4-cup measure. More blossoms mean more flavor for the jelly. Bring the water to a boil, add dandelion blossoms. Gently simmer 10 minutes over low heat. Strain through cheese cloth or a jelly bag. Squeeze excess to get the last bit of juice. Add more water if needed, to make 3 cups. Combine lemon juice, sugar and pectin. Bring to a rapid boil, stir constantly until sugar is dissolved. Boil hard for one minute. Skim if necessary. Pour into hot sterilized jars and seal. The flavor is hard to describe. It tastes bright like sunshine. Makes a very nice gift. I like it on toasted English muffins.



۞>>>>۞<<<<۞

Here's your prize at this stop ~ 20 lovely 5.5 x 4"
rose-themed note cards with envelopes.
After you've visited all the wonderful Authors in Bloom blogs,
check out my main blog:
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/

I'm participating in the month-long
A to Z Challenge and blogging the alphabet.
Scroll back to start at A!



۞>Saturday & Sunday Happenings on my other blogs<۞

My Sexy Saturday

Weekend Writing Warriors

Fun Day Sunday 
http://calliopeswritingtablet.com/


Snippet Sunday
**
A promo op for you too!**
http://exquisitequills.blogspot.com/
۞>>>>۞<<<<۞